Gilles Deleuzes Critique Of The Image Of Thought – ONLINE

Is there a natural affinity between thought, reason and truth? Is the purpose of thought to represent reality accurately, or to respond to it creatively? Is it possible to develop a philosophical theory of thought and experience at all, or will this inevitably exclude certain groups of people? These questions are the focus of Gilles Deleuze's Difference and Repetition, which represents a unique moment in post-structuralist thought: the attempt to develop a version of empiricism that did not rely on a supposedly universal 'Image of thought.' This course will focus on the third chapter of Difference and Repetition, which clears the way for Deleuze's empiricist philosophy by exposing the 'subjective presuppositions' that have haunted the philosophical concept of 'Thought' since Plato, as well as the evolution of his 'Image of Thought' concept throughout his career. Our goal will be to situate Deleuze's 'transcendental empiricism' within the history of Western philosophy, engaging directly with his readings of Hume, Descartes, Kant, Nietzsche, Feuerbach, Plato and Aristotle, as well as literary authors such as Proust, Carroll and Artaud.

Who is this course for

This course is at Upper Intermediate level and so would not be suitable for people who are new to studying philosophy. It would be an ideal continuation course for students who have previously studied on our Intermediate level courses and who now want a course that will look at the work of a particular philosopher or theme in some depth. It may also be suitable for people who have had some previous grounding in Philosophy and who now want to study in more depth.

Although you should have some previous experience of studying philosophy it is not expected that you need to have a great deal of familiarity with Gilles Deleuze or 20th-century French philosophy, as this is what the course will aim to provide. However, some basic familiarity with at least one early modern philosopher such as Descartes, Hume or Kant would be useful.

What does this course cover

Other Upper Intermediate or Advanced level Philosophy courses at the Mary Ward Centre or other similar establishments. Other courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences with a strong emphasis on theory and the study of the mind and human behaviour (e.g., Psychology, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, History). The work of Gilles Deleuze is also highly influential in the arts, and in particular the study of literature, cinema and painting, so this course may be of relevance to students who are interested in the intersection between philosophy and the arts.

What will it be like

The course will be run online using Zoom for the live class sessions and either the Moodle page for the course or some other system for the distribution of the electronic resources for the session sitting alongside this. Although there will be some adjustments that need to be made for the online version of this course, we will aim to keep the experience as close as possible to that of a face to face course taught in the Centre.

Classes will take the form of 'leminars,' or hybrid lecture-seminars These classes begin with a short lecture on the week's theme and the core texts, before turning to group discussions, exercises and debates in the second half. There will be readings assigned for each week-usually a section of Difference and Repetition and a section of another text. Students are welcome to submit questions about the readings ahead of time.
There will be two forms of optional assessed exercises during the course. Firstly, students are invited to prepare essays on the topic of Deleuze's Difference and Repetition. Students are welcome to choose their own topic, but one recommended theme would be to apply one or more of Deleuze's eight 'postulates of the Dogmatic Image of Thought' to the work of other philosophers. Students will also be given the opportunity to sign up at the beginning of the course to give a class presentation on the set reading for a particular week. For example, in the second week, students could present on the idea of the cogitatio natura universalis, or on the idea of reason in Descartes's philosophy.

What else do you need to buy or do

The course will be run on Zoom, please make sure you have installed it in advance of your first class on your computer or mobile device. You can sign up for free here:

https://zoom.us/support/download

You will need a microphone (it's fine to use whatever is built into your device) and camera, so we can see you via video. You may also want to use headphones during the session.

You can participate in class sessions through the use of a computer, laptop, tablet or other similar internet enabled device. Please note that if you only have access to a smartphone, you will be able to attend the class sessions and participate in them but you will find it more difficult to benefit from the full range of materials and activities involved in the course if this is your only means of connection.

Make sure you have a small space to work in during the session and that as far as possible that you can keep this space quite and clear of interruption so that you can concentrate on what is happening in the class.

By signing up to the course you are consenting to being on camera. The content of the lesson may occasionally be recorded by the tutor for internal education and training purposes but any such recordings will not be made available to anyone outside of the Mary Ward Centre organisation without us asking you again for further permission to do so.

There will be one set reading for each week, and other recommended readings. It is expected that students purchase or acquire a copy of Difference and Repetition. The latest edition (Bloomsbury Revelations, 2014) has an RRP of £19.99, but is widely available at lower prices.
Students are expected to read the core reading for each class, which will usually be from chapter 3 of Difference and Repetition. Other readings are recommended.

What this course could lead to

Other Upper Intermediate or Advanced level Philosophy courses at the Mary Ward Centre or other similar establishments. Other courses in the Humanities and Social Sciences with a strong emphasis on theory and the study of the mind and human behaviour (e.g., Psychology, Economics, Sociology, Anthropology, History). The work of Gilles Deleuze is also highly influential in the arts, and in particular the study of literature, cinema and painting, so this course may be of relevance to students who are interested in the intersection between philosophy and the arts.

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I've been to many Centres to study in London and the Mary Ward Centre is one of the nicest I've studied in.

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Got a Question about this Course?

Contact The Departmental Administrator.

Why choose Mary Ward?

Mary Ward Centre is the adult education centre with a difference. We provide a wide range of subjects for people at all levels and run courses during the day, evening and weekends to suit your timetable. You can learn face to face at one of our centres (Bloomsbury or Waterloo) or take an online course

Get inspired and enjoy excellent teaching in an environment where each individual’s learning experience is valued. That’s what makes Mary Ward Centre ‘the friendly place to learn.’